The Southern Agrarian began as an offshoot from the Confederate Colonel blog which began in 2007. In 2013, the two blogs were again combined into one – this time under the Southern Agrarian name. The move reflects a shift in emphasis away from matters of history other than the cultural history of The South.

The Southern Agrarian is written by Stephen Clay McGehee and is a Christian site. While Southern culture is not explicitly Christian, it is firmly based on the fundamental tenets of Christianity. The Holy Bible is my final authority in all matters, and Jesus Christ is my Lord and my Savior and my King. While religious topics are not the subject of this site and such discussions are discouraged in the posts and in the comments, nothing that would dishonor God is permitted here. While my judgement on such matters is far from perfect, I will do my best to maintain a site that gives Glory and Honor to God while pursuing the objectives of The Southern Agrarian.

Monetary matters – You might notice that there are no advertisements, no donation button, no affiliate links, no memberships, or any other type of money-makers on this site. While I don’t fault others for doing that, and I encourage you to support other content providers that you agree with, I don’t want anything to distract from the fundamental message of The Southern Agrarian. If you like what you see here, the best thing you can do to support it is to share links to The Southern Agrarian, and encourage others to visit this site. Commenting on blog posts is also a great way to help.

Blog post replies – I’m not here to argue. If you simply want to say I’m wrong, a racist, hateful, etc., then help yourself. I’ll see it so you can get some satisfaction there, but it won’t be published. Been there, done that with other blogs; not going to do it again here. For everyone else, don’t assume that because the hate mail doesn’t get published that it isn’t received. It just goes with the territory. At the same time, reasoned debate and constructive criticism is a vital part of maintaining a healthy culture. It is needed and welcomed as long as it is also polite and civil. Disagreement is fine as long as the intent is to help understand and clarify an issue.

 

Subject Matter

In one word – Tradition. Life is a continuous chain in which the past, present, and future are all connected. Sometimes, all we really need to do is look back in order to see the way forward.

  • Homesteading in The South – not just how, but why
  • The traditional culture of the Old South and how it applies today
  • The beauty of Southern Agrarianism as a basic philosophy and lifestyle
  • What it means to be a Southern Gentleman or Lady
  • Gardening, raising chickens, and becoming more self-sufficient
  • Countering Globalist efforts to destroy our culture

 

Reposting content from this site

Permission is almost always granted upon request (use the Contact form) to repost content found on The Southern Agrarian with the following stipulations, unless otherwise specified.

  1. At the beginning of the article on your site, you must include the following statement using the same text style and size as used in the body of the article: “Written by Stephen Clay McGehee. Reposted with permission from The Southern Agrarianhttp://www.southernagrarian.com/” (with both the name and the URL being live links.)
  2. At the end of the article on your site, you must include the following statement using the same text style and size as used in the body of the article: “For more content like this, please visit The Southern Agrarianhttp://www.southernagrarian.com/ ” (with both the name and the URL being live links.)
  3. If the use and context of a reposted article substantially changes after publication, permission may be revoked. (I learned this lesson the hard way. Unless you’re a website in China wanting to use this content to sell black market “pharmaceuticals”, then you should be just fine.)

Reposting content without this is a violation of copyright laws and will be actively pursued.


About us – Ours is a modest but comfortable home, and while we usually dress a bit more formally than what is typically worn today, we would not stand out among those waiting in the checkout line at the grocery store. We live on one acre located on a dirt road in the rural western part of Volusia County, Florida. We own a 120 acre farm that is rented out to a cousin who has farmed it for several decades. I have been gardening and raising chickens (and sometimes ducks and geese) for a long time, but I have no special background in agriculture. I’ve been doing this long enough to have some idea of just how little I really know.